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Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre

Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre, Brisbane, Australia

Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre is located within Brisbane’s largest protected and most important wetlands, as per the Ramsar Convention.

It lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. It comprises of more than 1100 ha of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands and has a diversity of wildlife, including mammals, reptiles and inverterbrates.

Organisation name: Brisbane City Council

Funding support: Local government

Number of staff: 13

Number of visitors per year:

Overall aims of the centre

To offer rich opportunities for learning and connection with the natural environment; to be regional, national and international facilities of environmental communication and learning; to create sustainable communities through environmental learning and to engage communities in the sustainable use of Brisbane’s natural areas through environmental based programs.

Description of the centre

Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre is located within Brisbane’s largest protected and most important wetlands, as per the Ramsar Convention.

It lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. It comprises of more than 1100 ha of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands and has a diversity of wildlife, including mammals, reptiles and inverterbrates.

It also has extensive birdlife including black-shouldered and brahiminy kites, Australian kestrels, whimbrels, sandpipers, kingfishers and rainbow bee-eaters. Indigenous Australians have historical campsites and ceremonials grounds at the wetlands and continue to have links to this land.

Main CEPA work areas

Environmental learning program for schools; volunteer program (bushcare and interpretive guides); community engagement program (citywide activities in reserves and natural areas); events; resource centre.

Top three successes

1. World Wetlands Day Festivals

WMMWa Wetlands Festival (wim-wa World Music for Migratory Waders) – a week-long community event to promote the ecological and cultural value of wetlands, and celebration of the 40,000 migratory birds that visit Boondall Wetlands each year.

The festival showcases a range of world music to highlight the diversity of countries visited by the birds as they travel along the East Australasian Flyway each year from the Northern Hemisphere to reach the vital feeding and resting grounds of Moreton Bay.

Cultural diversity and connectivity comes alive through music, food, information stalls and workshops. In the spirit of international cooperation and conservation, the event aims to create awareness of the plight of migratory wader birds and the inextricable link between wetlands and their survival.

In 2009, an estimated 2500 people attended. This success was honoured with a Lord Mayor’s Commendation for Excellence in Environmental Achievement.

2. Bush Neighbours Program

  • Free program of in-school visits and follow-up reserve activity days.
  • Aims to introduce students to the values of, threats to and care of natural areas.
  • Created in-part as a solution to frequent arson events taking place in city reserves during school vacation periods.
  • Success of the program in it’s first year was honoured with a Lord Mayor’s Commendation for Excellence in Environmental Achievement.
  • Close to 5,000 students have participated in the program since 2007.

3. Volunteer Program

  • Community engagement program with regular bushcare volunteers committing over 1500 hours per year to weed eradication, plant propagation and fauna surveys
  • Regular interpretive volunteers provide guided walks and interpretive activities free to the community
  • Volunteer drafting and development of a 10 page information booklet featuring plants and animals of the Boondall Wetlands. The booklet was distributed to over 60 community groups encouraging them to visit the wetlands.
  • Volunteer drafting and development of an interactive tool available online in order to build knowledge and understanding of the ecosystems of Boondall Wetlands.

Top three challenges

1. Funding – both internally (from local government) and externally through sponsorship to broaden the scope of activities and events we are able to deliver
2. Human resource management and staffing
3. Strengthening networks between internal stakeholders; negotiating cross department transfer at policy and delivery levels.

Interpretation techniques – Creating signage / site information; using audio-visual tools; producing written materials; developing nature trails.

Visitor centres – Running a visitor centre; managing / creating habitat.

Participation – Working with disabled people; engaging young people; working with volunteers; engaging the local community.

Education and communication – Early years education; working with primary schools; working with secondary schools; delivering adult education; developing resources / materials.

Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre
31 Paperbark Dr. Boondall, Qld. Australia 4034
07 3403 1490

Website address: http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:BASE::pc=PC_2786

 

 

 

The WLI network is endorsed by the Ramsar Convention on wetlands and coordinated by WWT.

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T: +44 (0) 1453 891214
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